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Production   /  Jane Hammond

Black Cockatoo Crisis

Time is running out for Western Australia's iconic black cockatoos

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Impact areas

ENVIRONMENT

INDIGENOUS

Crew

  • DIRECTOR Jane Hammond

  • PRODUCER Jane Hammond

Synopsis

DURATION: 54 MINUTES

Western Australia's iconic black cockatoos are in crisis. Their numbers have fallen dramatically over the past few decades and all three species in the south west of WA could become extinct in just 20 years unless something is done to protect their habitats. With the loss of the banksia woodlands on the Swan Coastal Plain to housing, Carnaby's Black Cockatoos have come to depend on the once vast exotic pine plantations on Perth's northern fringe.

These pine plantations supply up to half of all the food needed to keep the population of Carnaby's alive but these too are disappearing. Within the next two years the remaining 6000ha of pines are slated for clearing leaving the cockatoos facing possible starvation.

Meanwhile the Baudin's Black Cockatoos are literally being shot out of the sky in an unequal battle for food with apple and pear growers in Perth's hills. And the Red Tail Forest Black Cockatoos are under threat from the loss of nesting hollows and declining habitat.

Black Cockatoo Crisis looks at the plight of our special cockatoos and what we can do to stop these threatened species disappearing for ever. The clock is ticking on our black cockatoos. Will we save them in time?

Support this project

2.39% funded
  • $170,000.00

    FUNDING GOAL
  • $4,070.00

    FUNDS RAISED
  • October 2023

    PROJECT ENDS
  • 26

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Donations

Joanna Blackley $50.00
Bu Wilson $100.00
Ellie Robertson $50.00
Sylvia Mestric $200.00
Brendon Cant $500.00
Jenny Brown $100.00
Belinda Rayment $100.00
Gerard McNeill $100.00
Courtney Cox $50.00
Jasmine Turco $25.00
Sophie McNeill $100.00
Gerard Siero $50.00
Janice Toole $100.00
Alex Woodward $50.00
Jenny Liddell $250.00
Sue Chapman $500.00
Anonymous $50.00
Anonymous $75.00
Sue Vivian $50.00
Kay Gibson $50.00
Stef Crowe $100.00
Paddy Cullen $50.00
Anonymous $1,000.00
Nancye Miles-Tweedie $50.00
Anonymous $20.00
Catherine Tauss $300.00

Issue Summary

A short summary of the issue the documentary is addressing

The three species of black cockatoo in Western Australia's south west are under threat. Habitat loss through land clearing is a major cause of the threat. There are less than 40,000 Carnaby's Cockatoo left, just 10,000 Baudins and around 10,000 red tailed forest black cockatoos. But time is running out.
On the outskirts of Perth, pine plantations have become a valuable source of food and safe roosting for the Carnaby but these pines are also falling. In the next three years all of the once extensive pines of Gnangara will have been cleared leaving the Carnabys that relie on these plantation forests facing possible starvation.
In the Perth foothills the Baudins cockatoos have learnt to adapt to the loss of their food source by targeting apple and pear orchards. In response orchardists are shooting the birds on site.
Our red tailed black cockatoos are also considered vulnerable. Can we turn this situation around in time to save these iconic birds?

Impact

What is the impact vision statement of the documentary?

The film will include a wrap around social impact campaign aimed at educating the public about the plight of the cockatoo and what they can do to help save these special birds. The impact vision includes inspiring people to visit their MP to call for an end to the clearing of banksia woodlands and for a massive revegetation program. Audiences will also be encouraged to plant cockatoo friendly nut trees and native plants.

Outcomes

What outcomes does the project hope to achieve from making this documentary?

Black Cockatoo Crisis will build awareness and education. It will inspire audiences to act to lobby for an end to clearing of banksia woodlands and halt the imminent destruction of the Gnangara Pine Plantation which has become a vital food source and refuge for the Carnaby's Black Cockatoo. It will also highlight the urgent need to protect the habitat of all three species of black cockatoo in south west WA and for the WA Government to outline and implement and emergency plan to prevent these birds from becoming extinct. The plan would include seven strategies as outlined by the Save the Black Cockatoo campaign. These would include:
1. Create partnership with joint management with Noongar communities
2. Set targets to expand forests and woodlands
3. Phase out rather than expand bauxite mining in forests
4. Review broadscale prescribed burning
5. Stop clearing banksia woodlands
6. Protect the Gnangara pine plantation
7. Encourage people to plant cockatoo food trees

Activities

How will this documentary achieve its outcomes?

The documentary will help launch the Save the Black Cockatoos Campaign. It will premiere at a public cinema event where guests will see the film and learn about the campaign and what they can do to help save the black cockatoos before it is too late. It will then be rolled out to schools and screened in town hall meetings and via cinema on demand and streaming services.

Stakeholders

How will partnerships with this project help inform the project development?

Th film is a partnership with the newly formed Save the Black Cockatoos Campaign. The film is being supported and assisted by the campaign.

Audience Engagement and Social Impact

What actions does this project hope for its viewers after seeing this film?

Viewers will become engaged in the fight to save the cockatoos. They will be encouraged to lobby their MPs, plant cockatoo friendly gardens and help halt any further destruction of banksia woodlands and the Gnangara pines.

Measurement and Evaluation

What is the projects indicators for success?

A change in Government policy.
Greater awareness.
Protection of the Black Cockatoos
Government and community recognition of the Black Cockatoo crisis