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Production   /  Philippa O'Donnell

Australian Black and White Stories

Contemporary stories of black and white Australians joining forces to overcome insurmountable odds all around our nation

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Impact areas

ENVIRONMENT

HEALTH & WELLBEING

HUMAN RIGHTS & SOCIAL JUSTICE

INDIGENOUS

WOMEN & GIRLS

YOUTH & EDUCATION

Crew

  • DIRECTOR Vicki Clark

  • PRODUCER Philippa O'Donnell

Synopsis

DURATION: 45 MINUTES

We're creating an anthology of stories of black and white Australians working together for positive outcomes. It begins with three stories including a remote North West group working with linguists to bring language from virtual extinction into every day use; a Melbourne project funds indigenous kids education so they can go to any school they choose; and an Elder established a community garden with an English migrant, to teach kids about culture, country and convergence. Black and White gives voice to seldom-heard people at the heart of our country’s development.
These films form the beginning of an ongoing national collection showing how black and white Australians are working together in cities, towns and remote communities, on diverse, critical projects, big and small. It's reconciliation in action.
They’re stories millions of Australians now want to know. Films, podcasts & articles produced by Black and White will be online so every Australian has access to them.

Support this project

0.14% funded
  • $220,000.00

    FUNDING GOAL
  • $300.00

    FUNDS RAISED
  • June 2021

    PROJECT ENDS
  • 3

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Donations

Jonathan O'Donnell $100.00
Anonymous $100.00
AM Yee $100.00

Issue Summary

A short summary of the issue the documentary is addressing

Australia’s indigenous population too often is reflected poorly in the nation’s media, through stories about poor health, poverty, addictions, incarceration, abuse and much more.
Reconciliation stories of black and white Australians working together for positive outcomes seldom make it to mainstream media, academia or the public arena. There’s an imbalance in what’s recorded, preserved and passed on. We are addressing this imbalance.
Our films give voice to black and white Australians who live reconciliation daily, working together to make significant, positive contributions to the Australian community. They epitomise our values of being inclusive, objective, passionate, empowering and responsible.
There's never been a more important time for these positive stories to be accessible to people all around the country.
They are stories of every day Australians working to make a difference in the daily lives of people in metropolitan, rural, suburban, remote and regional communities.

Impact

What is the impact vision statement of the documentary?

These three films will provide young Australians with counter-narratives to existing portrayals of indigenous matters as bleak and hopeless. By providing these films to educators, we will inspire the next generation of 13 – 15 year olds to take action on reconciliation.
The Australian community benefits through understanding, and having positive modern stories recorded & passed on. These stories will be important aspects of future research.

Outcomes

What outcomes does the project hope to achieve from making this documentary?

These three films will help shape attitudes of young people, and reshape attitudes of older generations. We will discuss with teachers what works, so we can continue to provide genuinely useful resources into the future. Young Australians will learn more about modern reconciliation stories, they'll study culture, language, ideas and unification they would otherwise not be exposed to.
Our films will increase understanding between indigenous Australians and those of us who came later. Viewers will educate people around them, sharing the stories and helping reconciliation.
We will place positive aspects of reconciliation on the national agenda, with storytellers telling their contemporary tales first-hand (in native language where appropriate) and in situ.
Viewers will play an active part in the national conversation surrounding our First Peoples' place in modern Australia and the convergence and reconciliation of divergent cultures in modern Australia.

Stakeholders

How will partnerships with this project help inform the project development?

Yes. Working with Australia's Aboriginal communities for decades means co-founder, Vicki Clarke is one of the best connected people in the nation to tackle and inform this important project. We have formal links with people, communities in all States. They have agreed to tell their stories.
Partnership talks are underway with Youthworx, a social enterprise which takes homeless and at-risk youth from the streets of Melbourne, teaching them how to make documentaries. In addition we have started talks with documentary makers in various jurisdictions with the aim of linking into local resources for each story, to minimise accommodation and travel costs and boost local involvement and income.
Formally support is via lawyers Herbert, Smith, Freehills; accountants G.J. Norton; corporate communicators Cannings Purple; web & social build Scribble.Gig; curriculum specialist, Sally Borrman; Research Whisperer; Alchemy Construct.

Audience Engagement and Social Impact

What actions does this project hope for its viewers after seeing this film?

Viewers will talk about our films, they will interact online and connect with the projects showcased in the films and on the website.
They will interact with comments, requests, story ideas and seek ongoing information. They may donate services, funds, ideas and information. They will upload their own short, Black and White stories for a carefully-curated record of their own reconciliation story.
Schools and students will study more about modern reconciliation stories, they'll study culture, language, ideas and unification they would otherwise be exposed to.
Viewers will increase understanding between indigenous Australians and those of us who came later. They will educate people around them, sharing the stories and helping reconciliation.
Viewers will play an active part in the national conversation surrounding our First Peoples' place in the Constitution, constitutional reform and the reconciliation of divergent cultures in modern Australia.

Measurement and Evaluation

What is the projects indicators for success?

We will record and examine feedback at story launches through personal contact, survey forms and Q & A sessions. Online surveys on the website and via mailchimp will further help us assess the impact vision statement. Personal donations and offers of support, along with online signups for ongoing information will be other indicators of achieving our impact vision.
Political responses and big business support will be recorded and assessed as important indicators, along with letters of support and attendance numbers at project events.
Web statistics and media coverage will be used to quantify the impact vision success, along with public contributions for story leads, ideas and contacts.
Assessing student and school numbers involved in modern Black and White story classes, are key indicators of the impact statement success.
Also, the number of individual quick story uploads to the website are important gauges to assess how we achieve our impact vision.

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