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Production   /  Felis Black/Upstride Agency

Maningrida Couture

Female Arnhem Land textile artists leave Australia for the 1st time to exhibit in Paris during Fashion Week.

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Impact areas

ARTS

ENVIRONMENT

HEALTH & WELLBEING

HUMAN RIGHTS & SOCIAL JUSTICE

INDIGENOUS

WOMEN & GIRLS

YOUTH & EDUCATION

Crew

  • DIRECTOR Matt Holcomb

  • PRODUCER Jane Metlikovec

Synopsis

DURATION: 55 MINUTES

In late September 2019, five Arnhem Land women - aged 30 to 50s who speak English as their 4th language - packed up their handmade fabrics, drove eight hours to Darwin and bought shoes for the first time.
The following day, they left Australia for Paris. Invited by the Australian Embassy to exhibit their latest fabric collection in the world’s fashion capital during the world's biggest Fashion Week, the artists of Maningrida’s Bábbarra Women’s Centre crowdfunded their way to the French capital to open their exhibition.
In France, they have also undertaken a fashion shoot with Vogue, participated in a private pattern making workshop with leading fashion designer Martin Grant, held a discussion at the world's leading Indigenous Culture Museum MQB, taken a trip to a Normandy Chateau, and have been experiencing a way of life a world away from the only cultures they know - followed the entire time by the Upstride/Felis Black production crew.

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  • $300,000.00

    FUNDING GOAL
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  • May 2020

    PROJECT ENDS
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Issue Summary

A short summary of the issue the documentary is addressing

Bábbarra Designs is a textiles enterprise located in Maningrida, an Aboriginal community in Arnhem Land, NT. Established as a women’s refuge in the early 1980s, Bábbarra was founded with a strong vision for Maningrida women’s rights. It now supports more than 25 female screen printing textile artists who represent 12 language groups.

Bábbarra provides employment for women from a range of cultural homelands around Maningrida, where there are limited ways to generate sustainable incomes in meaningful ways. Working in the arts affords one of the best opportunities for doing two things that most people want to do: remain in Arnhem Land with their families and work to earn a reasonable income.

Not only are the artists working - they are creating fabric of such calibre they have exhibited in Paris during Fashion Week. Their's is a story of true inspiration to young Indigenous and girls right across the world. It doesn't matter where you live and how remote it is - you can achieve anything.

Impact

What is the impact vision statement of the documentary?

Increase respect and opportunity for Indigenous women, their culture and their art throughout Australia and the world.

Outcomes

What outcomes does the project hope to achieve from making this documentary?

We would like to see Bábbarra Designs fabric being purchased by major fashion houses throughout the world - generating sustainable income for the Bábbarra Women's Centre. We would also like to inspire the next generation of female indigenous artists, and also non-Indigenous girls from low SES backgrounds right around the world. The Bábbarra Women prove that anything is possible.

Stakeholders

How will partnerships with this project help inform the project development?

Not formal partnership arrangements as yet.

Audience Engagement and Social Impact

What actions does this project hope for its viewers after seeing this film?

1. Buy Bábbarra fabric
2. Provide opportunities to Indigenous artists
3. Provide opportunities for Indigenous employment
4. Young people grow up with increased respect for Indigenous people.

Measurement and Evaluation

What is the projects indicators for success?

Via the broadcast deals we secure - we will know how many people we can reach.
Via Bábbarra fabric sales.

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